Travel

Hraunfossar

Hraunfossar

Hraunfossar was one of the most surprising stops. It’s off the road quite a bit but worth stopping. It’s an area that is kind of desolate but when you get to the waterfalls you are blown away. The color of the water is amazing. The color is from the water coming from two sources -one from a glacier and one from a lava field. The craziest and most beautiful blue water.

 

Hraunfossar

Laufás turf house

The only turf house I went in. Turf houses were built in response to the harsh weather in Iceland. Walking around this house is just amazing. Multiple rooms, great views from the upper floors, and their own little church.

Laufás turf houseLaufás turf houseLaufás turf houseLaufás turf houseLaufás turf house

On the way into Reykjavík I saw my last batch of ponies. I just love these guys.

Reykjavík

I did not have a lot of time in the Capital city – which is a shame. What little time I did spend in the city was a fun

Blue Lagoon

The last day in Iceland I visited the Blue lagoon. I don’t normally hit “tourist traps” but I’m so glad I did. It was an amazing morning relaxing before heading to the airport to catch the plane back to the states. The Blue Lagoon is highly recommended. I went early so there were not many people but by the time I left, it was getting quite full. So go early if you get the chance to go. All these were shot on an old Olympus Tough camera.

Blue LagoonBlue LagoonBlue LagoonBlue LagoonBlue LagoonBlue Lagoon
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
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That concludes my Iceland pictures – for now!

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Puffins and Whales Iceland

I got a little overwhelmed in editing my photos of Iceland. When you go to a place like Iceland, you are going to take a lot of photos but it’s always good to remember that you are going to have to go through and edit all those photos!

Puffins and Whales

One of the fun things I did in Iceland was take a speed boat tour from Húsavík which is on the North coast and under 40 miles from the Arctic Circle. The boat went to Puffin Island but because it was mating season we were not allowed to stop and explore the island so while I got to see a lot of and I mean a lot of puffins, I was not able to get close to any.

Next up was whale watching. We found a whale pod and followed it for a good hour. It was amazing. The whales never full breached the water but it was fun to watch them come up and down to eat.

Puffins and Whales Iceland

Goðafoss

One of my favorite waterfalls – though I say that about all of them. The weather was beautiful and overcast.

Goðafoss
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Skogafoss

Iceland Travel Notes

All the shots in this post were taken in one day. It’s amazing how fast the landscape and weather change in Iceland. It really makes a challenge for photographers.

Iceland Roadside Church

Strokkur Geyser

Stokkur is one of the most reliable geysers in the world. It blows every 6-8 minutes. It was so fascinating to sit and watch. Right before it was going to blow you would see this blue bubble forming. I watched it blow at least 6 times. It’s an amazing geothermal area with pools everywhere.

Gullfoss

These images were the hardest to capture from the whole trip. The sun was incredibly bright and the water in the falls was extreme. The whole area was covered in mist and even if you were a distance from the falls your lens element got wet. Since it was so sunny I was treated to a rainbow created by the falls. This was also the most tourists I saw in one area, even with a ten stop ND filter you could not blur out the mass of people.

Countryside

I read around every corner in Iceland is a picture and I can say that it is true. Some random shots from driving around during the day.

Vik

Iceland

By the time I got to Vik it was late in the day and I was running on steam. I wanted to get to the hotel and get some rest. I rushed through a few pictures.

Skogafoss

This was the last stop of the day before the hotel. This waterfall was a beauty! It was not even a busy site. It’s hard to tell scale on these and I was lucky this guy in a bright orange jacket decided to walk into one of my shots.

Hotel View

When I pulled into the hotel this was the view that wished me goodnight. In May the sun never really sets. I don’t think I ever saw darkness in Iceland so this was as close as I got to sunset my whole trip.

Iceland
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Seljalandsfoss

Driving the Ring Road

After leaving the airport I headed straight to 1. I did not want to spend much time in Reykjavik since I knew I would be there for a few days at the end of the trip. The first day of the trip was very wet. The kind of wet you could stand outside for less than a minute and get drenched wet.

It was almost impossible to keep the front element of my lens dry for long enough to get a shot. The landscape was non-existent in large part because it was raining so heavy. Small breaks in the rain would offer glimpses of a hazy but beautiful landscape. I kept hoping the rest of the trip would not be quite so wet.

 

Iceland
A glimpse of the landscape during a break in the rain.

Seljalandsfoss

This waterfall was the first “big” feature we came to. It was raining so hard that it was hard to see driving up. It’s hard to imagine a waterfall this massive being hidden in the rain. Seljalandsfoss is a stunning waterfall with a 200-foot drop. One of the things that make this waterfall so amazing is the fact you can walk behind it. By the time I got around the waterfall I was soaked – my clothes were dripping and I was shivering because it was hovering right above the freezing mark.

Iceland Horses

After leaving the area I made my way back to the hotel. I was going on almost 48 hours of being awake and I wanted to get a good nights sleep so I could be ready for the next 8 days. On the way back to the hotel I ran into these beauties. They were the first horses I saw! They even lined up for me to take their picture. Then on down the road, I saw the mama and her sweet baby

Blue Skies and New Days

The next morning I woke up and the sun was starting to shine and blue skies poked through the clouds. I decided to stop by Seljalandsfoss one last time since the previous day had been so dreary and I got the shot I wanted. It was quite early so myself and three other photographers had the whole place to ourselves.

Seljalandsfoss

All shots were taken on the Olympus Em1mkii with the Olympus 12-100 PRO lens.

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Námafjall Geothermal Area Iceland

Iceland

Recently, I spent eight days in Iceland driving the Ring Road. I spent many miles zig-zagging through the whole country. I’ve wanted to go to Iceland for many years. I wanted to see this wild desolate place for myself. Iceland did not disappoint.

Around every corner was something breathtaking or just amazing. Large parts of the country are very desolate but in that desolation is a kind of beauty. I resonate with this quote by Hannah Kent,

“In Iceland, you can see the contours of the mountains wherever you go, and the swell of the hills, and always beyond that the horizon. And there’s this strange thing: you’re never sort of hidden; you always feel exposed in that landscape. But it makes it very beautiful as well. “

As I sort through my memories and photos I will be doing a series of small articles and images that I took in Iceland. This is the first installation.

Námafjall Geothermal Area

One of the first sets is Námafjall Geothermal Area. This area is in the Northeast area of Iceland. It’s a very desolate area and probably the closest to an alien planet I’ll ever stand on.  The smell is overpowering – burning sulfur and it stays with you until you take a shower.

The colors of the ground remind me of movies I’ve seen that take place on Mars. The oozing and bubbling mud pots are fascinating to watch – they are so hot (around 392 degrees Fahrenheit) that it quite literally boils the grey mud.

Námafjall has a large number of warning signs and ropes to block off areas people are not supposed to be. Even with the threat of death I still saw footprints past the barriers. It makes me sad that some people think that they are above the rules. Not only do they put themselves and others (who might try to rescue them) in danger, it destroys the natural beauty for others. When visiting places like Iceland please be respectful.

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